No – not for you, for me. You see, somebody has nominated me for the UK Blog Awards 2017. The Awards are sponsored by Odeon Cinemas and there are seventeen different categories. I’ve been entered into the Health and Social Care group.

I’ve been writing my blog for nearly ten years now, and I’ve used it primarily to highlight the problems with the diagnosis and treatment of Pernicious Anaemia. Because I deal with the telephone calls from both members of the society, and those who have yet to sign up, I am in the unenviable position of hearing how the current failings in the diagnosis and treatment impact on the everyday lives of not only patients but also their families and friends.

Yes, some of the stories are harrowing at best and frighteningly cruel at times. But rather than just shaking my head and keeping these stories to myself I want to inform society in general about the problems associated with Pernicious Anaemia. I don’t aim my writing at any particular group because the way in which Pernicious Anaemia is diagnosed and treated is an issue that affects the population as a whole – and that includes not only patients, but also those who are undiagnosed but with many of the symptoms.

And it works. Followers of my blog come from all strata of society, young and old, professionals and non-professionals. Often, it is my blog that medical professionals use to find out a little about me before making contact; “as you point out in your blog” is a common statement. And that’s why I write these stories without pointing accusing fingers at doctors or other health professionals and without using any inflammatory language; if I did that, if I wrote sensational stories bemoaning the lack of adequate diagnostic tools and procedures and raged against the whole system, I wouldn’t be read by those who are in a position to change things.

The purpose of my blog is exactly the same as the purpose of the Pernicious Anaemia Society – quite simply to raise awareness of the problems associated with the disease. It’s not intended to sensationalise issues; it’s not about pointing accusing fingers at anyone or ranting about the scandalous things that happen. Rather it is simply keeping my growing band of readers abreast of what I deal with on a daily basis.

And that will help achieve the overall goal of the society – to raise awareness of the problems with the diagnosis and treatment of Pernicious Anaemia to bring about change.

So, come on; it’s time for some action on your part now. To register your vote and help further raise awareness of our problems click on the square image below to give me your vote. Feel free to share on your Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest or other social media as well. We’ve still a long way to go but, together, we’ll get there in the end.